Argovia-Projects 2013

Project Project Leader Collaborators
 
A8.1 Bio-DURACLEAN Bio-DURABLE self-Cleaning painting: development of dirt repellency coatings for large surface O. Glaied (FHNW Muttenz) U. Pieles (FHNW Muttenz), W. Meier (Uni Basel), G. Siragna (Walter MÄDER AG, Kilwangen; AG)
A8.3 EL-ENA Electrophoretic active hybrid core shell silica nanoparticles decorated with dendritic structures for colored electronic ink (e-ink) and e-paper applications U. Pieles (FHNW Muttenz) G. Grundler (FHNW Muttenz), G. Nisato (CSEM Muttenz), R. Öhrlein (BASF Research Center, Basel, BS), A. Hafner (BASF Research Center, Basel; BS)
A8.7 NANOX Mixed mode nanocomposite catalyst for the effective decomposition of hydrogenperoxide vapour used in sterilization processes of pharmaceutical GMP clean room production facilities and isolator systems U. Pieles (FHNW Muttenz) P. Shahgaldian (FHNW Muttenz), C. Housecroft (Uni Basel), O. Scheuber (SKAN AG, Allschwil; BL)
A8.8 NAPOHIC Nano carbon based semi conductive polymers for high voltage cables J. Gobrecht (PSI) J. de Pietro (FHNW Windisch), M. Kristiansen (FHNW Windisch), L. Xie (ABB Corporate Research, Baden-Dättwil; AG)
A8.9 TIGHTSEAL Gastight thin films to minimize emissions of graphite sealings M. Waser (FHNW Muttenz) U. Pieles (FHNW Muttenz), J. Gobrecht (PSI), U. Wegmann (Klinger AG, Egliswil; AG)

A8.1 Bio-Duraclean – Bio-DURABLE self-Cleaning painting: development of dirt repellency coatings for large surface

2013-2015

In the project Bio-Duraclean, an interdisciplinary team under the leadership of Dr. Olfa Glaied from the Institute of Chemistry and Bioanalytics of the University of Applied Science (FHNW) aims to develop a durable dirt repellent surface that can be used among other things for painting trains.

Researchers involved in the project will combine different promising approaches. First they use nature as a model and mimic the lotus effect. They accomplish this task by combining nano- and microparticles on a polyurethane matrix. A specific arrangement of the different particles will results in a roughness similar to that of the lotus plant leaves, so water drips off and takes dirt along. Different nanoparticle arrangements will be studied, for example silica. To optimize the water and dirt repellent effect, the scientists plan to cover the whole surface using a water repellent polymer. It will be a challenge for the project team to link the different components of the surface with each other and to attach them to the matrix and previous layers of paint. Researchers from Mäder AG, who are the industry partners of this project, will make a major contribution in this respect and will share Mäder´s adhesion technology.

In the project Bio-Duraclean, scientists from the teams of Dr. Olfa Glaied, Professor Uwe Pieles (Institute for Chemistry and Bioanalytics, FHNW), Professor Wolfgang Meier (Department Chemistry, University of Basel) und Dr. Jörg Reiter (Walter Mäder AG, Killwangen) work closely together.

 

A8.3 EL-ENA – Electrophoretic active hybrid core shell silica nanoparticles decorated with dendritic structures for colored electronic ink (e-ink) and e-paper applications

2013-2015

Professor Uwe Pieles from the Institute of Chemistry and Bioanalytics (FHNW) is the project leader of ELE-NA. Within this project, researchers study the use of specific nanoparticles as e-ink and for e-paper applications.

Electronic books are becoming more and more popular. They are light, handy and easy to use. Using an e-reader, a whole library is always at hand and nowadays they can be read in bright sun as well as in the dark without any problems. Whereas the latest models mimic the appearance of printed black and white text on paper, the first prototypes for colored displays are still plagued with insufficiencies. The researchers engaged in ELE-NA would like to chance this. Instead of using pigments, as in the current, energy consumptive e-readers, they plan to choose stable colored nanoparticles exhibiting electrophoretic mobility. Upon the application of a current, the particles migrate in the electrical field, accumulate in the visible area and therefore cause a color change. To achieve this goal, the scientists plan to produce functional hybrid nanoparticles. The core consists of silica, whereas the shell carries a latent charge and the dyes. Like for an inkjet printer, the dyes cyan, magenta and yellow are sufficient to create all other colors.

Before such a color e-reader is available, numerous studies are required. The size of the particles as well as the optimal proportion between core and shell are of great importance. Additionally, the color strength and the controlled charging of the particles are essential for optimal functioning. Co-workers of Professor Uwe Pieles and Professor Gerhard Grundler (both Institute for Chemistry and Bioanalytics, FHNW), Dr. Giovanni Nisato and Dr. Wolfgang Tschanun (both CSEM Basel) work closely together in this demanding project. They are suppported by the industry partner in this project Dr. Reinhold Öhrlein and Dr. Andreas Hafner (both BASF Research Center).

 

A8.7 NANOX – Mixed mode nanocomposite catalyst for the effective decomposition of hydrogenperoxide vapour used in sterilization processes of pharmaceutical GMP clean room production facilities and isolator systems

2013-2015

Besides ELE-NA, Professor Uwe Pieles is leading another Argovia-project called NANOX. With this approach, scientists plan to develop a new catalyst that facilitates the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

Pharmaceutical products and food are produced under strictly controlled sterile conditions in order to prevent contamination with microorganisms. Nowadays, vaporized hydrogen peroxide is often used for surface decontamination in clean room facilities and isolators. After the decontamination, the systems are aerated with sterile air. To save energy and to reduce the effect on the environment, the air is recirculated. This requires an active decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide at the end of the sterilization process. The scientists in the project NANO are now planning to develop a ceramic composite catalyst, in which metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in an inert inorganic matrix are combined with immobilized catalase molecules. Catalase is an enzyme that can be commonly found in many organisms and that efficiently catalyses the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. In the proposed catalyst, the metallic nanoparticles work hand in hand with the natural enzyme.

In NANOX, co-workers from the FHNW from the teams of Professor Uwe Pieles and Professor Patrick Shagaldian are collaborating with researchers from the University of Basel from the groups of Professor Catherine Housecroft and Professor Edwin Constable. The industry partner in the project is Olivera Scheuber from SKAN AG, Allschwil, a market leader for isolators and clean room facilities.

 

A8.8 NAPOHIC – Nano carbon based semi conductive polymers for high voltage cables

2013

Renewable energies such as wind and solar energy are only available locally and their power output fluctuates tremendously. This calls for a massive expansion and renovation of power grids. A large part of the networks has to be realized underground or underwater by insulated high voltage cables. Todays multi-layer insulation systems have proved to be successful. However, this technology reaches its limits when it comes to the requirements of the future networks. Among others, these need to have an increased transmission power and a high load changes stability.

The goal of the project NAPOHIC (Nano carbon based semi conductive polymers for high voltage cables) is the examination of new nano-additives based on carbon in the individual polymer layers of the isolation system of high voltage cables so that these fulfill future requirements.

Partners of the project NAPOHIC are: ABB Corporate Research, FHNW Technique and the Paul Scherrer Institute. Professor Jens Gobrecht is leading the team.

 

A 8.9 TIGHTSEAL – Gastight thin films to minimize emissions of graphite sealings

2013

Under the leadership of Marcus Waser from the FHNW, scientists in the project TIGHTSEAL develop a thin gastight film for graphite sealing.

Gaskets for gases and liquids that are used in the chemical and petrochemical industry need to comply with certain requirements, which set a limit for emission. Even under the exposure of chemicals, they need to be tight and should be independent from temperatures in their sealing properties. Flexible graphite sealing fulfill many of these prerequisites. They are chemically resistant to almost all media and long-term stable in air from cryogenic up to temperatures as high as 500°C. Due to the nanoporous structure of several layered graphite nano sheets, the graphite sealing does not fully meet the requirements for emission. In the project TIGHTSEAL, the graphite foil will be coated with a thin airtight film in the nanometer range. This coating should improve the tightness so that safety standards are met without altering the excellent properties of graphite itself.

Teams of Marcus Waser, Professor Uwe Pieles (both FHNW), Professor Jens Gobrecht (PSI) as well as the industry partner Dr. U. Wegmann (Klinger AG, Egiswil) contribute to the project TIGHTSEAL.