Metal leads to the desired configuration

Scientists at the University of Basel have found a way to change the spatial arrangement of bipyridine molecules on a surface. These potential components of dye-sensitized solar cells form complexes with metals and thereby alter their chemical conformation. The results of this interdisciplinary collaboration between chemists and physicists from Basel were recently published in the […]

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Probing individual edge states with unprecedented precision

A new technique makes it possible to obtain an individual fingerprint of the current-carrying edge states occurring in novel materials such as topological insulators or 2D materials. Physicists of the University of Basel present the new method together with American scientists in “Nature Communications.” While insulators do not conduct electrical currents, some special materials exhibit […]

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New mechanism of electron spin relaxation observed

Physicists at the University of Basel are working on using the spin of an electron confined in a semiconductor nanostructure as a unit of information for future quantum computers. For the first time, they have now been able to experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of electron spin relaxation that was predicted 15 years ago. The scientists […]

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Novel approach to coherent control of a three-level quantum system

  For the first time, researchers were able to study quantum interference in a three-level quantum system and thereby control the behavior of individual electron spins. To this end, they used a novel nanostructure, in which a quantum system is integrated into a nanoscale mechanical oscillator in form of a diamond cantilever. Nature Physics has […]

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Electrical contact to molecules in semiconductor structures established for the first time

Electrical circuits are constantly being scaled down and extended with specific functions. A new method now allows electrical contact to be established with simple molecules on a conventional silicon chip. The technique promises to bring advances in sensor technology and medicine, as reported in the journal Nature by chemists from the University of Basel and […]

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How does Parkinson’s disease develop? Study raises doubts on a previous theory of Parkinson’s disease

Cross section of an alpha-synuclein fibril. Left: 3D reconstruction of the fibril, showing two interacting protein molecules. Right: atomic model of the fibril structure. Parkinson’s disease was first described by a British doctor more than 200 years ago. The exact causes of this neurodegenerative disease are still unknown. In a study recently published in eLife, […]

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Startup from Basel Qnami wins Venture Kick finals

The young startup of the University of Basel, Qnami, is the winner of the Venture Kick prize worth 130’000 Swiss Francs. Qnami develops precise and highly sensitive quantum sensors that provide images in nanometer resolution. Modern quantum technology provides the basis for Qnami’s goal to improve imaging techniques and diagnostic methods. The quantum sensors developed […]

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Water is not the same as water

Water molecules exist in two different forms with almost identical physical properties. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in separating the two forms to show that they can exhibit different chemical reactivities. These results were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and their colleagues in Hamburg in the scientific journal Nature Communications. […]

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Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox observed in many-particle system for the first time

Physicists from the University of Basel have observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time. The phenomenon dates back to a famous thought experiment from 1935. It allows measurement results to be predicted precisely and could be used in new types of sensors and imaging […]

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Individual impurity atoms detectable in graphene

A team including physicists from the University of Basel has succeeded in using atomic force microscopy to clearly obtain images of individual impurity atoms in graphene ribbons. Thanks to the forces measured in the graphene’s two-dimensional carbon lattice, they were able to identify boron and nitrogen for the first time, as the researchers report in […]

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