Like a Revolving Door: How Shuttling Proteins Operate Nuclear Pores

Nuclear pore complexes are tiny channels where the exchange of substances between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm takes place. Scientists at the University of Basel report on startling new research that might overturn established models of nuclear transport regulation. Their study published in the Journal of Cell Biology reveals how shuttling proteins known as […]

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Would you like to write a PhD?

You can now apply for seven new projects of the SNI PhD School.   In 2012, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute founded a PhD School to promote the education of young researchers in the nanosciences. The research activities address the cutting edge scientific and interdisciplinary approach of nanoscience and technology. If you are interested have a […]

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Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

  Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of […]

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SNI update July 2017

The new issue of SNI update is online.  You get to know more about Elise Aeby, who won the price for the best nanostudies master’s thesis and about the young start-up Qnami. Additionally, we introduce some new Argovia projects and report on awards and events with participation of the SNI.  SNI update is published four times a […]

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Coupling a Nano-trumpet With a Quantum Dot Enables Precise Position Determination

Scientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel have succeeded in coupling an extremely small quantum dot with 1,000 times larger trumpet-shaped nanowire. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers via the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dot. Conversely, the oscillation of […]

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Active Implants: How Gold Binds to Silicone Rubber

Flexible electronic parts could significantly improve medical implants. However, electroconductive gold atoms usually hardly bind to silicones. Researchers from the University of Basel have now been able to modify short-chain silicones in a way, that they build strong bonds to gold atoms. The results have been published in the journal «Advanced Electronic Materials». Ultra-thin and […]

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New Method of Characterizing Graphene

Scientists have developed a new method of characterizing graphene’s properties without applying disruptive electrical contacts, allowing them to investigate both the resistance and quantum capacitance of graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Researchers from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel’s Department of Physics reported their findings in the journal Physical Review Applied. Graphene […]

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Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form […]

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SNI update May 2017

The new issue of our newsletter SNI update is now online. We explain some phenomena of the quantum world, introduce Dr Sonja Neuhaus who heads a research group in the School of Engineering (FHNW) and report about activities of SNI members in recent months.  SNI update is published four times a year. If you are interested to receive our […]

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Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances. Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral […]

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